Twitter for charities

Today an article by Rohan Hewavisenti  advised charities to take advantage of twitter as a fundraising tool, highlighting an interesting advantage of the platform.  He listed few examples of success, like the Cancer Research UK campaign #nomakeupselfie, which  raised over £8m, or the #icebucketchallenge which helped in raising over £ 7m for amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, to which it can be added the more recent and interesting case of Laura Darrall, whose campaign  #itaffectsme, aimed to raise awareness for mental health issues, went rapidly viral.

The article points out how there are “no restrictions or permissions required to fundraise via Twitter or other social media”. He might refer to a new regulation, the “Fundraising Preference Service” that unable people to opt out from all telephone and mail fundraising.    

 

Glasgow: American Teens to the rescue?

The video is part of a fundraising campaign that went wrong.

Two American siblings decided to rise money for Glasgow as they proclaimed “we are planing to participate with local youth, sharing a message of hope and goodwill with energy and enthusiasm”. According to them “this could turn the situation around” for Glasgow referring to the poor state of the city and the Glasgow effects.

The video went viral reaching the Scots who were angered and offended with the siblings’ description of their city. Most likely they just wanted to raise a money for a nice trip to Glasgow, and maybe volunteering for a bit, but they didn’t expect that their message will reach out the scots turning them into unwelcome guests.  Lesson: plan and research your content before it goes live.

Likes don’t save lives

The video shows two famous Swedish personalities trying to pay food with likes.

UNICEF viral campaign “Likes don’t save lives”  in 2013 took a direct approach to remind people that liking or retweeting does not mean donation. People often tend to view social media as entertainment source rather than a serious platform for donating their money. People believe that they helped by clicking the “like” button. UNICEF’s ad helps in raising awareness to not stop at clicking but to go further and act. The ad was extremely successful and it helped the vaccination of 637 324 children against polio, showing that social media can educate and effectively reach people.

Matt Collins pointed out in the guardian how the high volume of messages exchanged at any time on social networks makes the charity only able to reach  2.6 % of their audience with their message, and victim of a staggeringly high bounce rate, going as far as suggesting to abandon social media marketing altogether.  His article touches many aspects that are probably true and not just for charities: recently DeRay McKesson hoped  he can turn his 330,000 followers into at least 20,000 votes in the mayoral race for Baltimore,obtaining instead a mere total of 3077. Does this mean that social media shouldn’t be used by charities or organisations? Going back to UNICEF success with their campaign, one may argue that it was mainly to be attributed to UNICEF established name, however I believe being aware of social media limitations and specificities informed the campaigned and in doing so enabled the organisation to best capitalise on their social media presence.

 

7 top influencers support #ROAR4TCA

A campaign has been lunched by Collab supporting Teen Cancer America  to spread the word about the teen cancer on Facebook, YouTube, Instagram, and Vine. They requested from their audience three things: (1) To post a “ROAR” photo or video (2) To tag  three friends and ask them to do the same (3) To tag the campaign name along with the specified channel.

They also went further by asking 7 Influencers to be part of the campaign:

  1. Brendon McNerney (Vine: 405.7 K followers)
  2. BigCatDerek ( Vine: 1.1M – Youtube: 46,932 subscriber)
  3. Julia Abner (Vine:107K- Instagram:9,500)
  4. Woodsie (Vine: 242.5 K- Youtube: 18,021- Facebook: 66,424- Twitter: 3463)
  5. Natalia Lopez  (Youtube: 7653- Instagram: 12.8K)
  6. Joey Ahern (Vine: 580 K- Twitter: 13.7 k)
  7. TheyLoveArii (Youtube:380,038-  Twitter: 93.9K)

Teaming up with influencers will help charities in reaching new people and extending their network. To do so, (1) charities need to identify channels and influencers with whom their audience is highly engaged and (2) to carefully plan how they can work with the influencer to create a strategic partnership.

Bold is Beautiful

Researchers have found that “donors who feel engaged by a charity will donate 50% more annually than those who feel neutral about the cause they support“. Engagement includes any activity “that causes a supporter to invest in a charity  either cognitively, emotionally, and behaviourally”. Here is a campaign with an innovative and creative idea for activities to get the donors involved.

A campaign supported by the cosmetics brand “Benefits”, in partnership with two charities, Look Good Feel Better UK and Refuge, will take place on Sunday the 8th of May, with a march through the streets of London to raise funds, under the hashtag  #boldisbeautiful . Participants will be provided with t-shirts and a map signalling the special checkpoints across the city,  where they will be able to find different activities and rewards.

Visual impairment charity launches a visual campaign

An inspiring new campaign (#ExetersBlindSpot) form the WESC Foundation focus on the people of Exeter unaware of the life changing work WESC provides day to day. Created through the generous collaboration of AB agency, that produced the film free of charge, the project represent a perfect example of charities encouraging synergies with the business world through social media, resulting in an effort that can achieve both increased support for the charity and greater visibility of the agency profile online. In order to create the above video, AB researched and analysed the Exeter community to get a sense of the local “donor gaze”, the specific traits of the targeted audience. Social media engagement is the core of the campaign Their research targets involved to three main channels: Twitter, Facebook and YouTube. “AB’s using a digital strategy team that will be monitoring all engagement to understand the impact locally as well as carrying out research with different audiences to find out feedback on the campaign”. A strategic campaign that fully capitalize on the dialogic possibilities of digital marketing, by testing the audience response to the film and act according to the feedback! the production value of the video content makes the campaign richer (it’s known that about 60% of viewers will watch the video before reading the text attached to it)