#ComicRelief Collaborations

 

 

On Red Nose Day, Comic Relief digital strategy included collaborations with WattPad, YouTube stars, and a Snap Chat Live story. NPF Synergy focuses on Comic collaboration with WattPad that enable them to build a new fan base using an unexpected platform to connect with new audiences. As NPF Synergy point out to the statement of Tender CEO on brand tie-ups: the key is finding a way for brands to communicate with users in an “accretive way” that does not “disrupt the users’ experience”. And Comic Relief was able to access the platform without disrupting user experiences with their partnership with Leigh Ansell’s, a 21-year-old Wattpadd writer who have her own built-in fan base.

#tip: Branding collaborations is a strategy that you might need to consider in your digital marketing mix.

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Thank You, for saving lives…

 

 

Currently, an emotional ad running on TV with cancer survivors and their families saying  “thank you” to all donors and contributors who funded the cancer research.  The ad was made simple with only a real cancer survivors telling their stories and sending their appreciation to the audiance. A very heart capturing ad emphasising the role of donors in saving lives.

The Ad was integrated with social media campaign that aims to engage people into conversation and encourage them to leave donations to the charity. Content in its own can be very touching, but engagement play a greater role in outreaching more people.

 

Pokémon GO for Charities

People are seen in the parks, police stations, shopping malls catching Pokemons, the new craze and sensation for tech games lovers. The game has been downloaded 7.5 million times from Google Play and the iOS App Store in the U.S., Interestingly nonprofit business innovatively  embraced the hype, and highjacked the app to attract more people to their causes, starting from snapping pictures to Pokémon that they found in their charities location, or they might be lucky enough to be a Pokestop, or by simply going to those Pokestops to advertise for your charity.

Unwrapped Project: a good case of charity using SEO

“Click Consult has won one of marketing’s most prestigious awards – The Drum Search Award for Best Charity/Not for Profit Campaign for SEO – for its innovative search campaign for Oxfam Unwrapped, featuring social media, earned media and design work.” SEO can play a great role when used correctly, together with blogger engagement and social amplification. When the charity’s website is easy to navigate and reach through the search engine, it makes easier to foster a conversation with the potential donor.  Many high profile charities are now using SEO tools to outreach to more audience  and to increase awareness on their cause.

Twitter for charities

Today an article by Rohan Hewavisenti  advised charities to take advantage of twitter as a fundraising tool, highlighting an interesting advantage of the platform.  He listed few examples of success, like the Cancer Research UK campaign #nomakeupselfie, which  raised over £8m, or the #icebucketchallenge which helped in raising over £ 7m for amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, to which it can be added the more recent and interesting case of Laura Darrall, whose campaign  #itaffectsme, aimed to raise awareness for mental health issues, went rapidly viral.

The article points out how there are “no restrictions or permissions required to fundraise via Twitter or other social media”. He might refer to a new regulation, the “Fundraising Preference Service” that unable people to opt out from all telephone and mail fundraising.    

 

Glasgow: American Teens to the rescue?

The video is part of a fundraising campaign that went wrong.

Two American siblings decided to rise money for Glasgow as they proclaimed “we are planing to participate with local youth, sharing a message of hope and goodwill with energy and enthusiasm”. According to them “this could turn the situation around” for Glasgow referring to the poor state of the city and the Glasgow effects.

The video went viral reaching the Scots who were angered and offended with the siblings’ description of their city. Most likely they just wanted to raise a money for a nice trip to Glasgow, and maybe volunteering for a bit, but they didn’t expect that their message will reach out the scots turning them into unwelcome guests.  Lesson: plan and research your content before it goes live.

7 top influencers support #ROAR4TCA

A campaign has been lunched by Collab supporting Teen Cancer America  to spread the word about the teen cancer on Facebook, YouTube, Instagram, and Vine. They requested from their audience three things: (1) To post a “ROAR” photo or video (2) To tag  three friends and ask them to do the same (3) To tag the campaign name along with the specified channel.

They also went further by asking 7 Influencers to be part of the campaign:

  1. Brendon McNerney (Vine: 405.7 K followers)
  2. BigCatDerek ( Vine: 1.1M – Youtube: 46,932 subscriber)
  3. Julia Abner (Vine:107K- Instagram:9,500)
  4. Woodsie (Vine: 242.5 K- Youtube: 18,021- Facebook: 66,424- Twitter: 3463)
  5. Natalia Lopez  (Youtube: 7653- Instagram: 12.8K)
  6. Joey Ahern (Vine: 580 K- Twitter: 13.7 k)
  7. TheyLoveArii (Youtube:380,038-  Twitter: 93.9K)

Teaming up with influencers will help charities in reaching new people and extending their network. To do so, (1) charities need to identify channels and influencers with whom their audience is highly engaged and (2) to carefully plan how they can work with the influencer to create a strategic partnership.

Bold is Beautiful

Researchers have found that “donors who feel engaged by a charity will donate 50% more annually than those who feel neutral about the cause they support“. Engagement includes any activity “that causes a supporter to invest in a charity  either cognitively, emotionally, and behaviourally”. Here is a campaign with an innovative and creative idea for activities to get the donors involved.

A campaign supported by the cosmetics brand “Benefits”, in partnership with two charities, Look Good Feel Better UK and Refuge, will take place on Sunday the 8th of May, with a march through the streets of London to raise funds, under the hashtag  #boldisbeautiful . Participants will be provided with t-shirts and a map signalling the special checkpoints across the city,  where they will be able to find different activities and rewards.

persuasive content a new drive for charities

The Guardian explores how a quality of ruthlessness was used in some famous slogans for important causes made to effectively make a deep impression and captured their attention and support. The article emphasises on the importance of considering emotions as the secret ingredient for the success of a campaign. Emotional content connects audience to the organisation’s ads and urges people into acting.

This brings me to Nathalie Nahai, a web psychologist and international speaker, keynote from last week #SEObrighton conference. Charities need to design  a persuasive toolkit that Nathalie  articulates in the three phases: grab, provoke, convert; transforming your audience in active participants (either buyers or donors) is just as essencial and requires just as planning as engaging your audience. To do so it’s important to understand the phycology of decision making: unsurprisingly, decision making to take action is an emotional process. ‘Trust’ is another factor which is important to consider while trying to get people to take an action, and to get your audience’s trust you need to establish a construct your message based on homophily, as people  get attracted to others who share the same values as them. Thus, for an effective communication demographic and psychographic research is essential.

Volunteerism or tourism?

 

The video above from Reach out Volunteers shows you how volunteerism might be fun…

Barbie Savior   Instagram account that recently gained popularity and attracted followers with interest on the  volunteer work abroad, depicts a behaviour of some volunteers during their travels in third world countries which raises moral questions: taking pictures with poor children, teaching them without proper qualifications are all common examples of how volunteers underestimate the seriousness of the mission. Barbie Savior satirically pictures volunteers as barbie dolls wondering around for self pleasure instead of focusing on the mission or actually helping people. The account shed some light on charity action abroad, by enlightening the trustees it pushes them to question their organisation’s volunteerism action. Another aspect that the account exhibits is the power of social media either in educating or making people aware, and helping organisation to catch up with their act before reaching more serious consequences .