#ComicRelief Collaborations

 

 

On Red Nose Day, Comic Relief digital strategy included collaborations with WattPad, YouTube stars, and a Snap Chat Live story. NPF Synergy focuses on Comic collaboration with WattPad that enable them to build a new fan base using an unexpected platform to connect with new audiences. As NPF Synergy point out to the statement of Tender CEO on brand tie-ups: the key is finding a way for brands to communicate with users in an “accretive way” that does not “disrupt the users’ experience”. And Comic Relief was able to access the platform without disrupting user experiences with their partnership with Leigh Ansell’s, a 21-year-old Wattpadd writer who have her own built-in fan base.

#tip: Branding collaborations is a strategy that you might need to consider in your digital marketing mix.

Pokémon GO for Charities

People are seen in the parks, police stations, shopping malls catching Pokemons, the new craze and sensation for tech games lovers. The game has been downloaded 7.5 million times from Google Play and the iOS App Store in the U.S., Interestingly nonprofit business innovatively  embraced the hype, and highjacked the app to attract more people to their causes, starting from snapping pictures to Pokémon that they found in their charities location, or they might be lucky enough to be a Pokestop, or by simply going to those Pokestops to advertise for your charity.

Unwrapped Project: a good case of charity using SEO

“Click Consult has won one of marketing’s most prestigious awards – The Drum Search Award for Best Charity/Not for Profit Campaign for SEO – for its innovative search campaign for Oxfam Unwrapped, featuring social media, earned media and design work.” SEO can play a great role when used correctly, together with blogger engagement and social amplification. When the charity’s website is easy to navigate and reach through the search engine, it makes easier to foster a conversation with the potential donor.  Many high profile charities are now using SEO tools to outreach to more audience  and to increase awareness on their cause.

#Blogger: When influence goes bad

The case of Belle Gibson has resurfaced today as she is facing a legal action in Australia over “deceptive conduct”, that may cost her and her company “The Whole Pantry” around a million. The blogger was very popular and gained people trust through social media, and she promised charities donations, raised through her app and book, which has never been made. Questions had been raised that led to the discovery of her faking her illness ,  a brain cancer, to gain more sympathy. Even more troubling the fact that she pretended to get cured without conventional treatment, through simply an healthy lifestyle and diet, misleading many of her followers who might had left their chemotherapy as a result of her statements.

It has been suggested she suffers from Munchausen Syndrome, a psychiatric disorder  for which people fake  illness to draw attention and sympathy (named after the 18th century German baron famous for embellishing tales of his military exploits to anyone who’d listen), and interestingly but not surprising, if that were true, she would appear to be not the first blogger to suffer from such problem. Another famous cases include Lacey Spears,  who went to the extreme of killing her own child to gain media attention, Kaycee Nicole, who used to pretend to be teenager with Leukaemia! Trust in the space of Internet is  valuable and volatile currency, and the lack of proper screening is not uncommon  characteristic for online personalities. Charities need to be aware of this fact when approaching influencers.

 

Likes don’t save lives

The video shows two famous Swedish personalities trying to pay food with likes.

UNICEF viral campaign “Likes don’t save lives”  in 2013 took a direct approach to remind people that liking or retweeting does not mean donation. People often tend to view social media as entertainment source rather than a serious platform for donating their money. People believe that they helped by clicking the “like” button. UNICEF’s ad helps in raising awareness to not stop at clicking but to go further and act. The ad was extremely successful and it helped the vaccination of 637 324 children against polio, showing that social media can educate and effectively reach people.

Matt Collins pointed out in the guardian how the high volume of messages exchanged at any time on social networks makes the charity only able to reach  2.6 % of their audience with their message, and victim of a staggeringly high bounce rate, going as far as suggesting to abandon social media marketing altogether.  His article touches many aspects that are probably true and not just for charities: recently DeRay McKesson hoped  he can turn his 330,000 followers into at least 20,000 votes in the mayoral race for Baltimore,obtaining instead a mere total of 3077. Does this mean that social media shouldn’t be used by charities or organisations? Going back to UNICEF success with their campaign, one may argue that it was mainly to be attributed to UNICEF established name, however I believe being aware of social media limitations and specificities informed the campaigned and in doing so enabled the organisation to best capitalise on their social media presence.

 

7 top influencers support #ROAR4TCA

A campaign has been lunched by Collab supporting Teen Cancer America  to spread the word about the teen cancer on Facebook, YouTube, Instagram, and Vine. They requested from their audience three things: (1) To post a “ROAR” photo or video (2) To tag  three friends and ask them to do the same (3) To tag the campaign name along with the specified channel.

They also went further by asking 7 Influencers to be part of the campaign:

  1. Brendon McNerney (Vine: 405.7 K followers)
  2. BigCatDerek ( Vine: 1.1M – Youtube: 46,932 subscriber)
  3. Julia Abner (Vine:107K- Instagram:9,500)
  4. Woodsie (Vine: 242.5 K- Youtube: 18,021- Facebook: 66,424- Twitter: 3463)
  5. Natalia Lopez  (Youtube: 7653- Instagram: 12.8K)
  6. Joey Ahern (Vine: 580 K- Twitter: 13.7 k)
  7. TheyLoveArii (Youtube:380,038-  Twitter: 93.9K)

Teaming up with influencers will help charities in reaching new people and extending their network. To do so, (1) charities need to identify channels and influencers with whom their audience is highly engaged and (2) to carefully plan how they can work with the influencer to create a strategic partnership.

#Secret No More

 

 

Although I’m an advocate of social media, I also understand how the characteristic features can be a double edged swords. This is especially true when it comes to the phenomenon of peer pressure, as for example some studies indicate that teens who are constantly  visiting social networks might be more likely to adopt poor habits, such as smoking, drinking. This danger is amplified by the anonymity that online identities can offer.  Just two days ago, the Secret, an anonymous texting app startup officially announced they were closing their service, which its insider platform to break out news such as Ever notes acquisition. The company wasn’t short of earning but according to its CEO David Byttow “Secret does not represent the vision I had when starting the company”. The app was meant to create a safe space for people to spread information and safely share opinions but it came to the headlines instead for spreading unfounded news. 

A similar app “Yik Yak”, which also keeps the user identity anonymous, has been used instead in very creative and positive ways. For example, it has been recently used to educated youth on HIV by a nonprofit (What Works in Youth HIV), which  employed strategically to spread knowledge not just for HIV prevention but also to help remove the social stigma still attached to  being HIV positive. Another positive case of the use of Yik Yak  was its role in preventing suicide attempts at colleges . There is a clear potential for these kind of apps to reach out youth and be used for the social good, however, just as equally there is a potential for offering powerful outlets to a darker side of our society, where lying, cyberbullying, harassments can be dangerously empowered. This leads to hard questions in regards to the cost-benefit balance for these new technologies, where a a bigger moral responsibilities is placed on the user, compared to traditional media.

Bold is Beautiful

Researchers have found that “donors who feel engaged by a charity will donate 50% more annually than those who feel neutral about the cause they support“. Engagement includes any activity “that causes a supporter to invest in a charity  either cognitively, emotionally, and behaviourally”. Here is a campaign with an innovative and creative idea for activities to get the donors involved.

A campaign supported by the cosmetics brand “Benefits”, in partnership with two charities, Look Good Feel Better UK and Refuge, will take place on Sunday the 8th of May, with a march through the streets of London to raise funds, under the hashtag  #boldisbeautiful . Participants will be provided with t-shirts and a map signalling the special checkpoints across the city,  where they will be able to find different activities and rewards.

#BoxOfHappiness

A cause related campaign from Chevrolet has just kicked in. It’s not a random act of kindness without reward, it’s a planned marketing campaign to appeal to the conscious    consumer. It’s a partnership mutually beneficial, Chevrolet will attract  different consumers and One World Play Project will  earn visibility.  Social media offer an unprecedented opportunity to size profitable partnerships like this for charities.

shocking or emotive Charity advertising

 

The charity advertising has become saturated  with emotive and shocking advertisement as being “emotive often makes it easier for charities to justify advertising spends, and avoid the hit/miss risk of fun or amusing advert”. Some marketing experts suggested the use of soft advertising that helps in building the image of the brand instead of  selling it.  While shocking people might seem sometime the quick solution, long term plans to gain your audience’s favour, to make them learn about your cause, can sometime bring better results in actually engaging supporters. In any case, the most important rule to remember is to think how to tell your story.