#ComicRelief Collaborations

 

 

On Red Nose Day, Comic Relief digital strategy included collaborations with WattPad, YouTube stars, and a Snap Chat Live story. NPF Synergy focuses on Comic collaboration with WattPad that enable them to build a new fan base using an unexpected platform to connect with new audiences. As NPF Synergy point out to the statement of Tender CEO on brand tie-ups: the key is finding a way for brands to communicate with users in an “accretive way” that does not “disrupt the users’ experience”. And Comic Relief was able to access the platform without disrupting user experiences with their partnership with Leigh Ansell’s, a 21-year-old Wattpadd writer who have her own built-in fan base.

#tip: Branding collaborations is a strategy that you might need to consider in your digital marketing mix.

Pokémon GO for Charities

People are seen in the parks, police stations, shopping malls catching Pokemons, the new craze and sensation for tech games lovers. The game has been downloaded 7.5 million times from Google Play and the iOS App Store in the U.S., Interestingly nonprofit business innovatively  embraced the hype, and highjacked the app to attract more people to their causes, starting from snapping pictures to Pokémon that they found in their charities location, or they might be lucky enough to be a Pokestop, or by simply going to those Pokestops to advertise for your charity.

Likes don’t save lives

The video shows two famous Swedish personalities trying to pay food with likes.

UNICEF viral campaign “Likes don’t save lives”  in 2013 took a direct approach to remind people that liking or retweeting does not mean donation. People often tend to view social media as entertainment source rather than a serious platform for donating their money. People believe that they helped by clicking the “like” button. UNICEF’s ad helps in raising awareness to not stop at clicking but to go further and act. The ad was extremely successful and it helped the vaccination of 637 324 children against polio, showing that social media can educate and effectively reach people.

Matt Collins pointed out in the guardian how the high volume of messages exchanged at any time on social networks makes the charity only able to reach  2.6 % of their audience with their message, and victim of a staggeringly high bounce rate, going as far as suggesting to abandon social media marketing altogether.  His article touches many aspects that are probably true and not just for charities: recently DeRay McKesson hoped  he can turn his 330,000 followers into at least 20,000 votes in the mayoral race for Baltimore,obtaining instead a mere total of 3077. Does this mean that social media shouldn’t be used by charities or organisations? Going back to UNICEF success with their campaign, one may argue that it was mainly to be attributed to UNICEF established name, however I believe being aware of social media limitations and specificities informed the campaigned and in doing so enabled the organisation to best capitalise on their social media presence.

 

Bold is Beautiful

Researchers have found that “donors who feel engaged by a charity will donate 50% more annually than those who feel neutral about the cause they support“. Engagement includes any activity “that causes a supporter to invest in a charity  either cognitively, emotionally, and behaviourally”. Here is a campaign with an innovative and creative idea for activities to get the donors involved.

A campaign supported by the cosmetics brand “Benefits”, in partnership with two charities, Look Good Feel Better UK and Refuge, will take place on Sunday the 8th of May, with a march through the streets of London to raise funds, under the hashtag  #boldisbeautiful . Participants will be provided with t-shirts and a map signalling the special checkpoints across the city,  where they will be able to find different activities and rewards.

The Story of #FindAzam

This video has been published 5 months ago, but the message it’s still somehow relevant. It is a story of hope for all of those who got separated from family, friends, loved ones because of any kind of natural calamity or humanitarian crises. The combination of simple tools, such an hashtag Twitter campaign to spread the word to those who can help reach the person who’s been lost, and the use of Facebook images to identify her/his location can be incredibly effective in such circumstances.

Unethical fundraising is bad for everyone

The reports exposes the problem of unethical fundraising taking, in particular in this case how elderly and generally more vulnerable people were specifically targeted, and presented this negative finding together with the fact that some of the larger charities spent less than 50% of their budget on the cause. Charities defend themselves by stating that they have to account for expenses such as fundraising, supplies, charity shops etc.  The nonprofit industry in  the UK composes  of 80 billion pounds / 105 thousand charities, making in it a sector of a significant size that has to be better understood. Unethical practices and budget mismanagement hurt the whole intustry exponentially, as marketing of any sort is already – wrongly – considered somehow incompatible with charities work.  That’s why charity spending needs double the consideration and an intelligent scrutiny, meaning an unbiased monitoring that takes fully into account the needs of the organisations to function and grow. Implementing  a charity valuator system should be a must to ensure not just that the donor is protected, but that the sector as a whole is not damaged.